Lincolnshire Waste to Energy Plant, UK

Glenconway Wind Farm, UK

Brackagh Wind Farm, UK

Solar Farms, Nationwide, UK

CLEAN AND RENEWABLE ENERGY (CARE)

The global energy ecosystem is in the midst of a transformation on a scale and at a pace perhaps unseen in history, buffeted by discontinuities in every direction. Deep trends in the global economy, including industrialization in emerging markets, changing demographics, rising nationalism, and technological and social innovations affecting cost and efficiency are confounding past assumptions about the supply, demand and consumption of energy – and the supply of fuels and feedstocks that drive it. Technology disruptions have unlocked vast new sources of energy (e.g. renewables, shale gas, tight oil) while changing the contours of demand for that energy (e.g. advanced materials, light-weighting, electric vehicles). Geopolitical developments are changing production profiles across regions, sometimes at a rapid pace. Traditional arenas are being redrawn by government policy and international agreements, reflecting changing public priorities and increased public scrutiny.

The energy system sits on the cusp of a profound expansion of technologies.  Already, hydraulic fracturing and directional drilling have unlocked shale, and advances in wind, solar, storage and smart grid technologies are changing the power industry. But this may only be the beginning: economic development requirements globally have increased demand for energy; increasing societal commitment to the environment has intensified demand for low-carbon energy; and technologies to meet that demand are becoming increasingly economical. Moreover, new technologies contributing to improvements in energy efficiency are decoupling energy consumption from economic growth. An unprecedented diversity of energy technologies may be poised for a breakthrough.


BLE is proud to be part of the global effort to back carbon reduction.  The renewables sector is growing every year and is is driven by multi-nation carbon reduction commitments which are upheld by government incentives and acceleration schemes, particularly in Northern Europe and more recently in the Far East.  The UK maintains a leading role through the introduction of the Renewables Obligation Commitment (ROCs) scheme and, in the case of offshore wind, the leasing of the sea bed to developers.  This, combined with the emerging regime for the transmission of power to shore and the potential for an offshore power network, provides engineering challenges on the same scale as the North Sea hydrocarbon boom in the ‘70s and ‘80s.  The offshore renewables sector has the potential to provide a significant contribution to Europe’s energy security and emissions reduction challenges.


Northern Europe, and the UK in particular, has a long coastline and some of the best wind, wave and tidal energy resources in the world.  The sector not only provides clean energy on a significant scale, but is also a valuable technology export offering to the rest of the world.  The UK has over 1.3GW of installed capacity of offshore wind – more than the rest of the world put together.  Through the Crown Estate leasing process, a further 47GW is in the development pipeline. Across Europe, over 100GW of projects are under consideration with the potential to supply 10% of Europe’s electricity.  The offshore wind sector is rapidly moving from commercial demonstration to full scale industrialisation, with power station scale projects now under construction in deeper water and further offshore than ever before. The wave and tidal energy sectors remain in the technology development stage, but with increased ROC funding, Crown Estate leasing rounds and the Saltire Prize, the stage is set for rapid acceleration into commercial reality.


​​Fossil fuels produce emissions that impact the environment when they’re burned. Natural Gas emissions are made up of water vapor and carbon dioxide. And while carbon dioxide is a large contributor to air pollution, natural gas that is burned in newer, more efficient power plants gives off between 50 and 60 percent less carbon dioxide than traditional coal plants and up to 30 percent less than oil. Natural gas also produces less sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide than oil, making it an even cleaner choice for air.


Natural gas emits nearly 90,000 fewer pounds of CO2 per billion Btu than coal and produces more energy than any of the fossil fuels. It has a 92% efficiency rate from wellhead to home, compared to electricity generated by coal or oil, which operates at only a 32% efficiency rate. Natural gas energy is also cost effective.


​Daily energy consumption and its impact on the environment directly correlates with the source of the energy. A greater percentage of environmentally-impacting energy comes from fossil fuels – coal, oil, and natural gas. While all fossil fuels impact the environment in some way, natural gas is cleaner and more efficient than oil and coal.


Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is natural gas that is compressed to between 200 and 250/300 barg. It is compressed to less than 1% of its volume. The gas is not treated or altered, just compressed to allow a greater amount of energy value to be contained in a smaller space, for example, in the tanks of a natural gas vehicle.


BLE have an extensive team of Gas Handling experts. One key area BLE contributes to the support of carbon emissions displacement, is the design, construction, operation and maintenance of CNG and L-CNG Refueling Infrastructure in private, public and commercial environments with fast-fill, time-fill and combination-fill configurations. BLE works with its customers to develop the most cost-effective solution through a series of reviews considering the design, functional requirements and total cost of developing a CNG / LNG fueling infrastructure. This most often depends on a number of factors, including fuel demand, HGV fleet's applications and duty cycles, site conditions, the complexity of equipment installation, and permitting processes. Learn more about our CNG capability here.



FEATURED PROJECT
The Manchester Energy from Waste (EfW) Plant is a private finance initiative which is set to treat 75% of Greater Manchester’s waste.  It will be the largest Energy from Waste facility in Europe.  The plant will generate 70MW of electricity and 51MW of heat.  Working closely with our client from the tender stage, we designed the piled foundations as well as the waste bunker, tipping hall, boiler house, flue gas area, vent stack and railway sidings supporting temporary works for the main facility.  


Some of our other related projects include: 
Glenconway Wind Farm, UK
Brackagh Wind Farm, UK

Lincolnshire Waste to Energy Plant, UK
Solar Farms, Nationwide, UK

​Cassava Pulp Feedstock Ethanol Plant, Thailand

​Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development Project, EU















Please contact us for further details if you have a specific inquiry.